Arabic club hosts fundraiser for Iraqi people in need

Club member Jack Hensien '18 cells candy for Arabic club fundraiser. Candy will be sold in the main hallway during first and second lunch.

Photo by Grace Reyes '19

Club member Jack Hensien '18 cells candy for Arabic club fundraiser. Candy will be sold in the main hallway during first and second lunch.

Grace Reyes '19, Staff Writer

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Since last December, a group of South students organized a club that is opened to all races and ethnicities to provide awareness for Islamophobia, or the dislike of Muslims.

“We decided that it be a great way to educate people on Arabic culture and it also overlaps with education on the Muslim culture as well,” Arabic culture club member Jack Hensien ‘18 said.

According to club adviser, Danielle Peck, the club encourages all students of any background to come and learn about the Arabic culture and the Muslim world.

“We are teaching people what they want to learn and what we think should be taught, involving Arabic culture. We want to educate anyone willing to attend our meetings,” Co-president, Isaac Kado ‘18 said.

The Arabic club has gotten together since Nov.14 and have been raising money for Help Iraq, an organization dedicated to supplying necessities and funding to the people in need in Iraq.

“We are doing a student to student coalition program and are raising money,” Kado said. “Then you give it to them (HelpIraq.org) and they buy toys and food and clothes for these kids.”

The candy will be sold for a dollar and all contributions will be given to the organization. According to Kado, they will be selling in the main hallway during first and second lunch until candy is sold out.

“The candy sale is a way for us to raise money,” Peck said. “We figured that students like to buy candy at lunch, and it’s been going pretty well. We are sending the money directly to families in the refugee program and directly to families in Iraq.”

The club’s regular meetings’ main focus is on educating people about Arabic culture and based on those ideas.

“We have lessons every week, not only on Arabic culture but also Islam, one of the most popular religions in the middle east,” co-president Amelia Abouljoud ‘18 said. “We try to connect Islam to other religions as well to show it isn’t very different than Judaism or Christianity.”

Arabic club meets every other Thursday at 7:00 a.m. in room 248.

“We welcome everyone, so even if you don’t identify as a student that’s Arabic, that fine because we have tons of students that aren’t and we want everybody to learn about the culture,” Peck said.

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