Homecoming hype: Students reflect on results of dance changes

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Homecoming hype: Students reflect on results of dance changes

Lizzie High and Owen Chen, both '20 are crowned Homecoming queen and king at the football game on Sept. 27. One of the new changes this year to Homecoming was incorporating male members of Homecoming court from every grade. Photo by Zach Farrell '21.

Lizzie High and Owen Chen, both '20 are crowned Homecoming queen and king at the football game on Sept. 27. One of the new changes this year to Homecoming was incorporating male members of Homecoming court from every grade. Photo by Zach Farrell '21.

Lizzie High and Owen Chen, both '20 are crowned Homecoming queen and king at the football game on Sept. 27. One of the new changes this year to Homecoming was incorporating male members of Homecoming court from every grade. Photo by Zach Farrell '21.

Lizzie High and Owen Chen, both '20 are crowned Homecoming queen and king at the football game on Sept. 27. One of the new changes this year to Homecoming was incorporating male members of Homecoming court from every grade. Photo by Zach Farrell '21.

Mairin Heimbuch '21 and Kate Weidig '22, Copy Editor and Staff Writer

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After declining attendance and a negative stigma surrounding the Homecoming dance, Student Association (SA) worked tirelessly to improve Homecoming this year for all.

According to Social Studies teacher Kendra Caralis, the changes that stood out the most to her this year, were the outdoor courtyard, the photobooth, time change, DJ and the lounge area.

“The commons were closed and they moved those activities to the upper areas of the gym, so there was a new game area and then a lounge area,” Caralis said. “The time shifted up one hour earlier so students could leave at 9:30, rather than 10:30 like years past. The DJ was moved to the stage, where it was on the floor in the middle before, and they also added a photo booth and opened the outside courtyard.”

The changes with new music made the dance better, because there were more songs that people knew and could dance to, according to Senior Kaitlin Ifkovits ‘20. 

“My favorite thing about this year’s Homecoming vs. past Homecomings, was that the music was a lot better,” Ifkovits said. “I also really liked how so many more people came this year because it made the whole dance a lot better than in previous years.”

Sophomore Maddie Blake ‘22 said that there were many positive things about this year’s Homecoming, but one negative thing was that the coat check in was very time-consuming and slow.

“My least favorite thing about Homecoming this year was the coat check in,” Blake said. “It was just inefficient because it took such a long time to put your stuff away, taking time away from the dance. Although, my favorite thing that was different about Homecoming this year was the DJ.”

The bonfire was a great place to get away from the crowd and cool yourself down whenever you wanted to, according to Caralis.

“I loved the ability for kids to go outside,” Caralis said. “It gets so hot in the gym, so it’s nice to get away from the noise and the heat and cool off. Plus s’mores.”

Although it was a positive addition to Caralis, the bonfire outside made you smell like smoke, so maybe next year they should consider an additional outdoor space, said Ifkovits.

“My least favorite thing about this year’s vs. last year’s was that the commons weren’t available to sit in if you didn’t want to be in the gym or by the bonfire, so you didn’t smell like smoke,” Ifkovits said. “I think that we needed a space without music or smoke from the bonfire to just hang out.”

Homecoming was an overall success and not many things are needed to be fixed, said Caralis. 

“I don’t think there was really anything I didn’t like,” Caralis said. “Definitely little tweaks like trying to get the hallways less crowded, but those are easy fixes. Overall, what I heard from kids was positive and they were having a great time.”